9 Trainers Share Their Ultimate Fitness Don’ts | sheerluxe.com
Whether you’re a fitness enthusiast or just getting started, it’s easy to get swept up in trends and fads. To debunk the myths and find out what really matters when it comes to overall health, we asked some of London’s top trainers for their fitness rules…
Favourites 11

DON’T FORGET ABOUT TECHNIQUE

“If you’re serious about getting fit, a few sessions with a personal trainer is vital to nail technique, as repetitive bad form can lead to injury. If you can’t afford a PT, you’re better off taking it slowly, focusing on getting that squat right, or perfecting the plank, rather than rushing through lots of workouts carelessly and without direction. Try working out in front of a mirror if you can, but remember investment in a PT will go a long way.” – Kira Mahal, founder of Reset LDN

DON’T OVERCOMPLICATE IT

“When it comes to exercise, there’s no need to complicate things. The key is to hit 30 minutes of moderate daily exercise and add in 20-minute bouts of vigorous physical activity a few times a week with rest days in between. Within your week, try to incorporate some strength training, an activity that challenges stability and balance, and movements that incorporate stretching and mobility.” – Gideon Remfry, wellness director at KX & KXU

DON'T IGNORE YOUR POSTURE

“So many of us spend our lives hunched over a computer, which will wreak havoc with your posture in the long-term. Working on stretching out the chest and activating the upper back will help you avoid niggling back pain. To help improve your posture, consider adding some ‘rowing’ movements into your workouts – think bent-over rows, renegade rows and upright rows, which can all be done with dumbbells, a resistance band or a TRX. The point is to engage the muscles surrounding your shoulder blades.” – Charlie Launder, founder of Bumps and Burpees

DON’T WORKOUT TO CREATE TENSION

“Create a routine that brings joy of movement and the results will follow. I like to mix it up with cardio, restorative and strengthening exercises. My weekly routine incorporates at least three barre workouts (these are great for cardio and can burn up to 700 calories in 45 minutes) and at least one mat or reformer Pilates session to strengthen and develop my technique.” – Catie Miller, founder of Xtend Barre London

DON’T NEGLECT STRETCHING

“Stretching is an important workout in its own right. It increases the production of collagen, which helps with firming and toning, increasing flexibility and correcting poor posture by lengthening tight muscles that pull areas of the body away from their intended position. Stretching assists in maintaining our lean muscle and can actually increase blood and nutrient supply to our muscles, thereby reducing fatigue. Make time for it every day.” – Catie Miller 

DON’T DO HIIT EVERY DAY

“Social media makes it seem like everyone is smashing out HIIT sessions on a daily basis, but don’t be tempted to follow suit. Doing HIIT everyday isn’t good for you – your adrenal system cannot cope with that much stress and you’ll end up not getting the results you were after. Balance your workouts with some slower-paced activity, such as strength training, yoga or Pilates.” – Charlie Launder 

DON’T DISREGARD BODYWEIGHT WORK

“Resistance bands are a hugely underrated way to tone up – from glute bridges to squats, leg kicks and side steps, there are so many exercises you can do with a simple band that goes around your knees and ankles. The same goes for walking lunges – they’re the ultimate bodyweight move. Try to keep yourself low to the ground, keeping the time under tension whilst coming back to the top of the rep.” – Alex Rogers, director of Chelsea Fitness Club

DON’T EXPECT TOO MUCH

“If you’re just starting out on your fitness journey, try to spend the first two weeks in the 'getting to know yourself' phase. Establish how far you can go without becoming tired, or how your body feels the next day when you push yourself. Learning about your body's feedback will also teach you things that you may not have known or encountered before.” – Neil Dimmock, fitness and education director at Ten Health & Fitness 

DON’T GET HUNG UP ON SOCIAL MEDIA

“Social media is a great way of showing how you could look or how you could do an exercise. But there’s no guarantee you’ll end up looking like the person doing the exercise (chances are the exercise or routine they’re showing didn’t make them look like that either). It can take a huge amount of time and effort to participate within some forms of exercise. Social media doesn't show you the amount of practice that often goes into making certain exercises, positions or poses look easy, when in reality they’re anything but.” – Neil Dimmock 

DON’T NEGLECT RECOVERY

“Adaptation (muscle gain, strength increase, aerobic improvements, etc.) doesn't happen when you are working out, but rather in the 24-48 hours after. What we do during that period can positively or negatively affect those adaptations. Adequate recovery is dictated by good sleep, good nutrition, low-level movement such as walking and reducing stress through breath work, meditation or cold showers.” – Lenny Leonard, head of PT at Ten Health & Fitness 

DON’T FORGET STRESS IS STRESS

“The stress on our immune system, the stress from a workout and emotional stress are all tolerated the same way by the body. You can tolerate a finite amount of stress before it will start to negatively impact your health. If you are feeling fatigued first thing in the morning, finding yourself in a bad mood or more emotional than usual, or getting ill more frequently, then you may be over reaching. Cutting back on intense training for a couple of weeks can help.” – Lenny Leonard

DON’T JUMP INTO A LONG RUN

“If you’re a beginner, don’t be tempted to head out for a long run. Instead, start with a walk/run combo and build up slowly over several runs. Walking for three to five minutes and then walking for the same amount of time is a good place to start. Also never stretch while cold – always do it after exercise when your muscles are warm.” – Cheyne Voss, physio director at Ten Health & Fitness 

DON’T GRIN AND BEAR IT

“I’m often asked what the best workout or type of exercise is that people should be doing, and my answer is always the same – it’s the one that you’re most likely to do. It’s got to be the type of exercise you enjoy and something that boosts you mentally and physically. Whether it’s a studio class or something you do at home, finding what works for you is the key to fitness success.” – Hannah Lanel, founder of The Fore

DISCLAIMER: We endeavour to always credit the correct original source of every image we use. If you think a credit may be incorrect, please contact us at info@sheerluxe.com.

You are not seeing this website as it was intended. Please try loading it in an up to date web browser.