How Women In Wellness Stay Healthy Over Christmas

Christmas is a time to indulge, but there are some steps you can take to make sure you keep things in balance. From the supplements that can support digestion to healthy breakfast ideas and hangover solutions, we asked some leading wellness experts to share their tips…
By Tor West /

Rhian Stephenson

Nutritionist & Founder Of Artah

“The thing is, you don’t want to let a few days of Christmas fun turn into six weeks of excess. Sweet treats are everywhere from now until the New Year, and it’s easy to fall into the habit of grabbing a Quality Street every time you pass the office kitchen, but eating in this way leads to food guilt. Instead, make sure what you’re indulging in matters to you. Christmas is a great example of a time when there’s more alcohol, stress and food, and less time for self-care, sleep and exercise. Be religious about giving your body the care it needs. Start your day with a protein, fibre and fat-rich breakfast, which will control cravings throughout the day and ensure you’ve shown your gut microbiome some TLC – my go-to is avocado, salmon and greens with olive oil – and ensure you’re eating plenty of cruciferous vegetables to support the liver. It also helps to have a few tried-and-tested workouts up your sleeve. Whether it’s a run or your favourite studio class, something you genuinely enjoy means you’re more likely to do it. When I’m hungover, a long brisk walk always helps, as does an electrolyte-rich drink, like Cellular Hydration.”

Visit Artah.co

Hannah Alderson

Nutritionist

“Always pair carbs with a source of protein or fat – this is far more important than counting calories. See every meal as an opportunity to add in nutrients to balance out the festivities. Add cinnamon to porridge and smoothies to support blood sugar balance; eat more kiwis, which are a great source of immune-supporting vitamin C; and if you’re at home for lunch, eat a source of protein with lots of colourful fibre, wholefood carbs and good fats – a salmon fillet or frittata with lentils and veg is perfect. If you’re out at a restaurant, look at the side dishes – there is always some form of green vegetable you can order. Stock up on zinc and B vitamin supplements, and take them before you head out and the morning after – if you suffer with post-party anxiety, try Mega Mag Calmeze. If you do overdo the mince pies, move on and make a positive choice at the next meal. How much damage can a few extra mince pies actually do? It’s what you do for most of the time that counts.”

Visit HannahAlderson.com

Kim Pearson

Nutritionist

“If you are drinking frequently, consider supplementing with milk thistle, which can help support the liver. Avoid daily drinking, though – alcohol hugely compromises recovery and is one of the biggest energy sappers. Avoid high-sugar mixers and cocktails, and instead opt for good-quality dry wines and champagne or good-quality white spirits. If you are hungover, have a cool shower, head out for a brisk walk, and take a nap. Also try reiki – it can work wonders on a hangover. Christmas food doesn’t need to be unhealthy, either. Smoked salmon with scrambled eggs is a fantastic, nutrient-dense option for Christmas morning, while the choice of quality chocolate has never been better – opt for one that contains a minimum of 70% cocoa. Instead of crisps, snack on omega-3-rich walnuts; make your own cranberry sauce with orange zest, ground cloves and xylitol; and indulge in seafood on Christmas Eve, which is low in carbs and rich in quality protein.”

Visit Kim-Pearson.com

Lolade Alakija

Nutritional Therapist

“Prioritise protein and fibre at every meal to keep your energy and mood stable. Load up on magnesium-rich foods such as dark green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds and wholegrains, which will ensure your body can effectively convert glucose into energy, as well as B vitamins, which can be depleted in times of stress and increased alcohol intake. This is also the time of year to show your gut, hormones and liver plenty of love – think herbs and spices, and probiotic and prebiotic foods, as well as anti-inflammatory foods like oily fish and nuts. Herbal tea is a fantastic way to stay hydrated, reduce inflammation, aid digestion and support the immune system. What you eat is only part of the story – it’s also essential to get daylight early in the morning to support the body’s circadian rhythm to boost oxygen circulation.”

Visit LoladeHolisticHealth.com

Monique Eastwood

Celebrity PT

“Try to stick to your usual fitness routine as much as possible, even if it means scaling things back – a 15-minute HIIT workout and brisk walk are better than nothing. If you can, fit in a workout first thing before the day gets away with you. Plus, it gets dark early, which sends motivation plummeting. I keep a set of dumbbells in my kitchen and fit in a couple of rounds of squats or lunges while I wait for the kettle to boil. If you have an evening event, eat as cleanly as possible during the day, packing in plenty of protein and green vegetables, and avoiding caffeine, which can act as a diuretic.”

Visit EastwoodFit.com

Bryony Deery

Founder of Pilates By Bryony

“Christmas can be a busy and stressful time, so taking the time to invest in some self-care is so important. I find headspace in walking and Pilates. I start my morning with a glass of Athletic Greens – it works wonders for digestion and energy – and do some Pilates, even if it’s just for ten minutes. The days leading up to Christmas can get incredibly busy with clients and meetings, so I wake up earlier to work out and ensure I’ve done something for me before the day starts. Then, I walk everywhere I can and often do walking meetings with a matcha latte. Intermittent fasting can help reset digestion and energy – I have my first meal around 10am or 11am, which tends to be a smoothie bowl with coconut water, spirulina, banana, blueberries and avocado.” 

Visit PilatesByBryony.com

Emilia Herting

Co-Founder Of Escapada

“In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), the spleen represents digestion. If we have a strong spleen, the food we eat is transformed into energy. The liver, meanwhile, is where detoxing happens, but fatty, sweet and heavy foods, as well as alcohol, put a strain on the liver. Lethargy, bloating, abdominal cramps, flatulence and constipation (or diarrhoea) are signs your spleen and liver aren’t in balance. Even if you’ve had a big dinner, never skip breakfast, and focus on keeping your middle warm – a bowl of warm porridge with stewed fruit is ideal. To take the burden off digestion and reduce appetite, drink warm water throughout the day. Also be wary of raw fruit – oranges, bananas and mango are difficult to digest and can weaken digestive fire. Instead, enjoy stewed fruit and avoid yoghurt, cheese and cow’s milk, which can make the body feel heavy. If you have a heavy meal on the cards, add bitter foods – like chicory, rocket, red cabbage and endives – to support fat digestion and liver function. And if you’re hungover, brew a strong cup of green tea, using three teabags per mug, which, according to TCM, reduces heat in the liver and soothes a sore head.”

Visit EscapadaHealth.com

Amy Brogan

Founder & Head PT At A Body Forever

“Christmas only happens once a year, so you’ve got to let go a bit – but also find balance amid the chaos. Have a look at your diary and set some rules. If your social calendar is full, perhaps you’ll make a decision to not drink at every occasion, maybe you’ll say no to some or you’ll condense some if you can. Put some boundaries in place and listen to your body. Give your body a helping hand with supplements – I swear by Superself’s Stress & Energy formulas, Lumity, lion’s mane mushrooms and charcoal tablets for a hangover. If you are drinking, have a vodka and fresh lime or a margarita without the sugar syrup.”

Visit ABodyForever.com

Farzanah Nasser

Nutritional Therapist

“A broad-spectrum digestive enzyme can be helpful when you are having larger, more indulgent meals – they’ll give your body the support it needs to break down your food, helping you to feel more energised after a meal. It’s also worth supplementing with magnesium, which can get depleted very quickly in times of stress. Plus, when we are stressed, our digestive capacity is reduced, so taking magnesium can support optimal digestion. I take a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar diluted in water before a big meal, too. If you don’t like the taste, add it to salad dressings. A quality vitamin C supplement, meanwhile, will support the immune system and help the body fight the free radicals produced by stress. Nutrition-wise, eat foods rich in sulphur, like eggs, onions, garlic, broccoli and cauliflower. Alcohol depletes levels of glutathione, the body’s main antioxidant, which affect the liver’s ability to break down alcohol, and sulphur-rich foods will bring levels back into balance.”

Visit FarzanahNasser.com

Louisa Drake

Founder Of The Louisa Drake Method

Keep sight of your fitness goals over Christmas but don’t be too hard on yourself. Walking is one of the easiest and most accessible forms of low-impact cardio. Another good rule of thumb is to avoid sitting on the sofa for more than an hour at a time, even if that means pausing something you’re watching to get up and stretch your legs for a couple of minutes. If you only have ten minutes, some movement is better than none at all – it all adds up. For example, low-impact bodyweight exercises in a short circuit (20 squats, 20 alternating lunges, ten press-ups and a one-minute plank hold) can create an effective full-body workout without the need for a lot of time or space. Sneak these in upon waking, or before getting ready to go out – you’ll hardly miss the ten minutes they take, but this will be enough to keep your muscles firing.”

Visit LouisaDrake.com

OLY BARNSLEY

DISCLAIMER: Features published by SheerLuxe are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. Always seek the advice of your GP or another qualified healthcare provider for any questions you have regarding a medical condition, and before undertaking any diet, exercise or other health-related programme.

DISCLAIMER: We endeavour to always credit the correct original source of every image we use. If you think a credit may be incorrect, please contact us at info@sheerluxe.com.

Fashion. Beauty. Culture. Life. Home
Delivered to your inbox, daily